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Do you consume oat drink, soy yoghurt, or other dairy alternatives?
EU parliament is attempting to ban any terms, marketing, or even appearance of vegan products that are associated to milk or dairy. This includes the terms "yoghurt" style, similar packaging in cartons or yoghurt cups, or even the comparison with milk's climate impact.

While this dairy-lobby-driven amendment is already through parliament, there's a petition to stop it in council. stopam171.com/

Some background on this: theconversation.com/vegan-dair

Terms like "soy milk" or "almond yoghurt" are already banned, this regulation attempts to erase the thought from consumer's mind that anything else than dairy products can be used for similar purpose.

Consumers are not so dumb to mix up products clearly labelled as vegan plant-based stuff. Given the climate and animal welfare impact of dairy farming, this vile attempt shows dairy producers are not willing to give their customers free choice.

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Disclaimer 1: Yes, this campaign is supported by several large-ish vegan food companies. But as this is a battle between industry lobbies I see nothing wrong with this. Notice that "Alpro" is missing – the brand is now owned by the huge dairy company "Danone".

Disclaimer 2: I find the term "censorship" used throughout the campaign a bit overblown. Nevertheless I support the main objective of the petition and just signed it.

✏️ stopam171.com/

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@schmittlauch tbh find ich "Zensur" in dem Kontext als viel passender/treffender als an so vielen anderen Stellen wo ich dne Begriff lese. Zensur hat immer eine staatliche Komponente dabei, oder zumindest die einer dominanten Gesellschaftsgruppe. Hier versucht der Staat (bzw. ein supranationales Staatengebilde) selbst objektive Vergleiche von Produkten (laut dem 1. Artikel) zu verbieten. Insofern lässt sich hier IMHO schon dieser Begriff verwenden.

@schmittlauch This is infuriating to me because I can’t have actual milk. It’s not that I choose oat milk because I’m deceived into it.

@Gargron The dairy industry would then probably tell you to use cow milk without lactose – at least if your condition allows that >.<

While I assume that this amendment mostly hinders new customers from switching over to plant-based products because they'd be more obscure to discover, all the people voluntarily drinking that stuff make it more widely available for people actually relying on it like you are.

@schmittlauch @Gargron Note that lactose intolerance is not a condition in the same sense as an allergy—it's one of the normal, genotype variants (very widespread worldwide). It's more like labeling light skin "UV intolerance".

@dmbaturin @Gargron It is a deviation from what is considered normal in the region affected by the regulations, that's what I mean.

If my post can be read otherwise, I apologise for that and try to avoid it in the future.

@schmittlauch @Gargron Well, that's the thing. _Both_ are normal. People with lactose intolerance aren't ill or abnormal in any way. (In fact, lactose _tolerance_ is a deviation from the base genotype of mammals—the enzyme required to digest lactase normally stops being produced after infancy, but in some people that gene is "broken" and the enzyme persists life long. In other words, lactose-tolerant people are mutants ;)

@dmbaturin Yes I know. Normal == the statistical norm of people and what they are expected to be.
Society expects you to be able to digest milk as lactose products are served without any comment or question and requesting lactose-free or plant alternatives is considered as a deviation from the default.

That's no judgement of individuals, but of their role and experiences in the society affected by these regulations.

@Dashtop
I believe they treat it with heat to break the lactpse down into sugars, but i cant tell you how exactly it works
@schmittlauch @Gargron

@Gargron @schmittlauch "Customer deception" is the dumbest argument. Even if this amendment passes, I can't believe that it will hold on a court of law.

@schmittlauch Honestly, I didn't notice that this happened and just bought what I want anyway. But it's sad that even such things get manipulated, probably by the same politicians always talking about free, unregulated market. 😐

@schmittlauch I don't consume any of those, unless the oldest vegetable alternative counts i.e. margarine, but this is nonsense.

It's not as bad as the whole "burger should only refer to meat/animal based stuff" kerfuffle but it's still up there.

I've heard a person claim they accidentally bought plant-based cheese, but even they admitted they were in a rush so I don't know how much of that can be put on the packaging saying "cheese" or whatever and not just being unclear to begin with.

@schmittlauch They pulled that stunt here in Missouri and now everything is labelled things like 'malk' or 'non dairy substitute' or my favorite euphamism, 'plant based hydration'. Vendors are sorting ordinary soy milk with energy drinks for that reason!

Don't let them get away with this nonsense.

@Almafeta They already got away with it in a way that products not from lactating animals are not allowed to be named "milk", but e.g oat drink.
What this new regulation would cause is even the ban of "non-dairy" – because that's a link to dairy products – or even "creamy".

@schmittlauch example 882 of why modern capitalism is toxic for both civil liberties and environmental health.

@schmittlauch @Gargron
Note that the vote in the #EuropeanParliament already took place and that the amendment was - unfortunately - approved: politico.eu/article/veggie-bur

Now the EU governments can still oppose this in the negotiations, but I wouldn't get my hopes up too high, given the political colour of most governments.
#CAP #EUCouncil #counciloftheEU

@schmittlauch

The funniest term related to this is "scouring Milk" aka "Scheuer-Milch". Will this also get banned?

@schmittlauch Our FDA tried the same thing with liquids that have milk in their name like almond, coconut, cashew, e.g.

@schmittlauch I kinda agree. Call it a Milk Alternative, and move on.

@schmittlauch
For fcuk sake... "rice milk" exists THOUSANDS of years. Yet these d-heads are pushing this nonsense...

@schmittlauch Milk is an animal product. We should stop accepting incorrect advertising just because that favors marketing.
This is a great thing in my opinion.
Advertising a plant product as dairy free is substantially misinformation and it damages the consumers as it implies that other plant based products do contain dairy.

@rastinza Well, a white liquid plant product that is *not* called milk and does not contain any is – in fact – dairy-free, so where's the misleading part?

Furthermore, I'd like to point to the more liquid variant of coconut cream, which is still allowed to be called "coconut milk".

@schmittlauch Coconut milk has been called like that for centuries it's substantially its name now.Advertising in that way is misleading. If I advertise my cabbage as grown without pig blood fertilizer I'm implying that other cabbages are grown that way, even if nobody uses pig blood as fertilizer.If a Muslim is offered my cabbage and an identical one without such an advertisement he will likely choose mine, as he is sure it does not contain pig. I'm misleading him into avoiding the competition.

@rastinza Soy milk has been called like that for centuries, just not in western Europe – as well as coconut milk.
Several kinds of cheese are labelled as lactose-free, which is misleading because most kinds do not contain a relevant amount of lactose anyways.
You might say that different kinds of cheese look similar enough to be mixed up. The same is true for white liquid beverages. For cheese, labeling is okay to prevent mixups, but for beverages the solution shall be different packaging – why?

@schmittlauch This is an European rule, made to be applied in Europe. European culture and its people understanding is very important in this.
I would never consider soy milk as milk but as a plant product, just like most Europeans would.
No plant product contains dairy.
With cheese that's quite different; all cheese comes from milk and the general production process is similar. You have no other way of knowing whether it contains lactose or not.

@schmittlauch das schönste ist ja, dass ich mir beim Aldi nen Kokosdrink kaufen muss, aber der Begriff Scheuermilch ist dann wieder okay? :D

@caprisonne Wahrscheinlich findet es die Molkereiindustrie™️ okay, wenn du an der Häresie des nicht-Milchprodukte kaufen stirbst. Aber es muss inbedingt verhindert werden, dass du noch auf den Geschmack von Haferpampe kommst!

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